That’s what he does! … And it absolutely will not stop… ever!

Which is a quote from the movie “The Terminator”. This guy showed up one day and he would just turn his head slowly while looking right at you. While we were in a back room he rammed into the sliding glass door about ten times in a row, after the tenth time I swore I heard him say….”I’ll be back”…;)

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Stings
Hornets have stings used to kill prey and defend hives. Hornet stings are more painful to humans than typical wasp stings because hornet venom contains a large amount (pkp,5%) of acetylcholine. Individual hornets can sting repeatedly; unlike honey bees, hornets and wasps do not die after stinging because their stingers are not barbed and are not pulled out of their bodies.

The toxicity of hornet stings varies according to hornet species; some deliver just a typical insect sting, while others are among the most venomous known insects. Single hornet stings are not in themselves fatal, except sometimes to allergic victims. Multiple stings by non-European hornets may be fatal because of highly toxic species-specific components of their venom.

The stings of the Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia) are the most venomous known, and are thought to cause 30–50 human deaths annually in Japan. Between July and September 2013, hornet stings caused the death of 42 people in China. Non-queens being 3,5 – 4 cm (1.4–1.5 inches) in length, the Asian giant hornet’s venom can cause allergic reactions and multiple organ failure leading to death, though dialysis can be used to remove the toxins from the bloodstream.

People who are allergic to wasp venom are also allergic to hornet stings. Allergic reactions are commonly treated with epinephrine (adrenaline) injection using a device such as an epinephrine autoinjector, with prompt follow-up treatment in a hospital. In severe cases, allergic individuals may go into anaphylactic shock and die unless treated promptly.

In Jewish tradition, it was once believed that the sting of a hornet could be soothed by crushing a housefly and applying it to the site of the wound.

Attack pheromone[edit]
Hornets, like many social wasps, can mobilize the entire nest to sting in defense, which is highly dangerous to humans and other animals. The attack pheromone is released in case of threat to the nest. In the case of the Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarina) this is also used to mobilize many workers at once when attacking colonies of their prey, honey bees. Three biologically active chemicals, 2-pentanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 1-methylbutyl 3-methylbutanoate, have been identified for this species. In field tests, 2-pentanol alone triggered mild alarm and defensive behavior, but adding the other two compounds increased aggressiveness in a synergistic effect. In the European hornet (Vespa crabro) the major compound of the alarm pheromone is 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol.

If a hornet is killed near a nest it may release pheromones which can cause the other hornets to attack. Materials that come in contact with this pheromone, such as clothes, skin, and dead prey or hornets, can also trigger an attack, as can certain food flavorings, such as banana and apple flavorings, and fragrances which contain C5 alcohols and C10 esters.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Photo by GCP

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